Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1615200
 
 

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Understanding Propensity to Initiate Negotiations: An Examination of the Effects of Culture and Personality


Roger Volkema


American University

Denise Lima Fleck


Coppead Graduate School of Business


IACM 23rd Annual Conference Paper

Abstract:     
Like many decisional processes, the early stages of negotiation play a critical role in determining how an encounter will unfold and, ultimately, the nature of the outcome. Yet for many individuals, initiating a negotiation is a difficult undertaking, frequently aborted if not avoided altogether. This paper tests a model of the initiation process, focusing specifically on those aspects of culture (individualism-collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity-femininity, power distance) and personality (risk propensity, locus of control, self-efficacy, Machiavellianism) that have been proposed to influence assertiveness and propensity to initiate. The study draws participants from diverse country cultures, and examines assertiveness/initiation propensity through three distinct measures. The results of these analyses for negotiators and future research are reported.

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Date posted: May 24, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Volkema, Roger and Lima Fleck, Denise, Understanding Propensity to Initiate Negotiations: An Examination of the Effects of Culture and Personality. IACM 23rd Annual Conference Paper. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1615200 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1615200

Contact Information

Roger Volkema (Contact Author)
American University ( email )
4400 Massachusetts Ave, NW
Washington, DC 20016
United States
Denise Lima Fleck
Coppead Graduate School of Business ( email )
Rua Pascoal Lemme, 355
Ilha do Fundão
Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972
Brazil
55 21 25989850 (Phone)
55 21 25989848 (Fax)
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