Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1628322
 


 



Japanese Banking Reform and the Occupation Legacy: Decompartmentalization, Deregulation, and Decentralization


J. Robert Brown Jr.


University of Denver Sturm College of Law

June 21, 2010

Denver Journal of International Law and Policy, Vol. 21, No. 361, 1993

Abstract:     
One of the explanations for the economic success of Japan in the post-War era was its compartmentalized banking system. City banks, with deposit raising authority, made short term loans to Japanese businesses. Long term banks, with debenture issuing authority, provided long term funding. Trust banks were responsible for asset management. The separation of banking and securities functions left to securities firms the market for primary offerings.

The manicured system facilitated government control of the financial system and allowed the government to direct capital to the businesses most likely to lead the economic recovery. In some ways, the approach reflected a continuation of the pre-War finanical system. At the same time, however, the US excrecised considerable influence over its evolution during the Occupation of Japan, something that only ended in 1952. This article examines the historical evolution of the Japanese financial system, from the pre-War period through the immediate aftermath of the Occupation.

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: June 22, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Brown, J. Robert, Japanese Banking Reform and the Occupation Legacy: Decompartmentalization, Deregulation, and Decentralization (June 21, 2010). Denver Journal of International Law and Policy, Vol. 21, No. 361, 1993. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1628322

Contact Information

J. Robert Brown Jr. (Contact Author)
University of Denver Sturm College of Law ( email )
2255 E. Evans Avenue
Denver, CO 80208
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 587
Downloads: 65
Download Rank: 202,190

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo2 in 0.359 seconds