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Strange Subordinations: Correcting Bankruptcy's Section 510(b)


Nicholas L. Georgakopoulos


Indiana University - Robert H. McKinney School of Law

April 7, 1999


Abstract:     
Accepting the premise of ?510(b) that rescission claims of junior claimants should not have the seniority of debt, Prof. Georgakopoulos examines its operation and finds four implementation errors. The subordination to the "same priority as common stock" is excessive and provides insufficient deterrence from securities fraud. The subordination of claims arising from (re)sales to the corporation is excessive because any overreaching transactions it prevents would be easy to identify, while it mistreats honest transactions. But the greatest errors of ?510(b) are the subordination of claims from the purchase of subsidiaries' stock, which allows similar transactions to have vastly different results, and the subordination of claims from the purchase of other securities. Both eliminate deterrence against defraud-ing securities purchasers while the (parent) corpora-tion is insolvent. Since such an error cannot have been intended, ?510(b) should be interpreted to apply only to claims arising during solvency.

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Date posted: July 7, 1999  

Suggested Citation

Georgakopoulos, Nicholas L., Strange Subordinations: Correcting Bankruptcy's Section 510(b) (April 7, 1999). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=163249 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.163249

Contact Information

Nicholas L. Georgakopoulos (Contact Author)
Indiana University - Robert H. McKinney School of Law ( email )
530 West New York Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
United States
317-274-1825 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://www.nicholasgeorgakopoulos.org

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