Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1632966
 


 



When Vitalism is Dead Wrong: The Discrimination Against and Torture of Incompetent Patients by Compulsory Life-Sustaining Treatment


Alicia R. Ouellette


Albany Law School

2004

Indiana Law Journal, Vol. 79, p. 1, 2004

Abstract:     
In some states, case or statutory law prevents patients or their families from declining life-sustaining medical treatment absent clear and convincing evidence that the patient would decide to terminate treatment under the specific circumstances presented. These vitalist laws are premised on the belief that erring on the side of life benefits all citizens. This article argues to the contrary, that vitalist laws can harm the very people they are designed to protect by compelling health care providers to provide medically inappropriate treatment that causes inhumane suffering throughout a prolonged dying process. Focusing on the case of Sheila Pouliot, a 42-year-old woman with profound disabilities, who was effectively tortured as a consequence of court ordered medical care that extended her dying process over the course of months, the article identifies vitalist laws and proposes changes that would prevent states from mandating inhumane, but life-prolonging, medical treatment.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 55

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: July 1, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Ouellette, Alicia R., When Vitalism is Dead Wrong: The Discrimination Against and Torture of Incompetent Patients by Compulsory Life-Sustaining Treatment (2004). Indiana Law Journal, Vol. 79, p. 1, 2004. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1632966

Contact Information

Alicia R. Ouellette (Contact Author)
Albany Law School ( email )
80 New Scotland Avenue
Albany, NY 12208
United States

Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 409
Downloads: 36

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo5 in 0.453 seconds