Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1640374
 
 

References (61)



 


 



Sequencing Regionalism: Theory, European Practice, and Lessons for Asia


Richard Baldwin


National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

June 2010

CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP7852

Abstract:     
Feedback mechanisms are the key to sequencing when it comes to regional integration. Feedback mechanisms can mean that today's policy or institution alters the political economy landscape in a way that makes it politically optimal for future governments to take further steps towards integration - even when these steps are not politically optimal from today's perspective. After outlining the theory, the paper uses feedback mechanisms to organise Europe's postwar integration narrative, and then draws lessons for today's integration of East Asia. The paper suggests that the spontaneous cooperation that created Factory Asia has not been codified. One starting point for Asian regional institutions would be to institutionalise the spontaneous cooperation that already exists on trade, services, and investment. New, creative thinking is needed on the sort of soft-law commitments and new modes of cooperation that would make this work with limited sovereignty pooling.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 56

Keywords: sequencing regionalism, bequest, capital accumulation, East Asian integration, inheritance, Lessons of European integration, regionalism, wealth

JEL Classification: D20, F02, F13, F15

working papers series





Date posted: July 19, 2010  

Suggested Citation

Baldwin, Richard, Sequencing Regionalism: Theory, European Practice, and Lessons for Asia (June 2010). CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP7852. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1640374

Contact Information

Richard Baldwin (Contact Author)
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 352
Downloads: 6
References:  61

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo5 in 0.656 seconds