Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=166409
 
 

References (23)



 
 

Citations (168)



 
 

Footnotes (17)



 


 



A Theory of Bank Capital


Douglas W. Diamond


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Raghuram G. Rajan


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; International Monetary Fund (IMF); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

April 1999


Abstract:     
Banks can create liquidity because their deposits are fragile and prone to runs. Increased uncertainty can make deposits excessively fragile in which case there is a role for outside bank capital. Greater bank capital reduces liquidity creation by the bank but enables the bank to survive more often and avoid distress. A more subtle effect is that banks with different amounts of capital extract different amounts of repayment from borrowers. The optimal bank capital structure trades off the effects of bank capital on liquidity creation, the expected costs of bank distress, and the ease of forcing borrower repayment. The model can account for phenomena such as the decline in average bank capital in the United States over the last two centuries, or the nature of disintermediation in liberalizing economies. Finally, it points to overlooked side-effects of policies such as regulatory capital requirements and deposit insurance.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 53

JEL Classification: E51, G21, G28, G32

working papers series


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Date posted: June 9, 1999  

Suggested Citation

Diamond, Douglas W. and Rajan, Raghuram G., A Theory of Bank Capital (April 1999). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=166409 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.166409

Contact Information

Douglas W. Diamond (Contact Author)
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-7283 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/douglas.diamond/

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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Raghuram G. Rajan
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
773-702-4437 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)
International Monetary Fund (IMF) ( email )
700 19th Street NW
Washington, DC 20431
United States
National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)
1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
773-702-9299 (Phone)
773-702-0458 (Fax)
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References:  23
Citations:  168
Footnotes:  17

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