Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1680785
 


 



Reputation and Cooperation in Defence


David Hugh-Jones


University of Essex - Department of Government

Ro'i Zultan


University College London

September 22, 2010


Abstract:     
In experiments, people behave more cooperatively when they are aware of an external threat, while in the field, we observe surprisingly high levels of within - group cooperation in conflict situations such as civil wars. We provide an explanation for these phenomena. We introduce a model in which different groups vary in their willingness to help each other against external attackers. Attackers infer the cooperativeness of a group from its members’ behavior under attack, and may be deterred by a group that bands together against an initial attack. Then, even self-interested individuals may defend each other when threatened, so as to mimic more cooperative groups. By doing so, they drive away attackers and increase their own future security. We argue that a group’s reputation is a public good with a natural weakest - link structure. We extend the model from cooperation in defence to cooperative and altruistic behavior in general.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 36

Keywords: cooperation, conflict, signaling, groups

JEL Classification: C90, D74

working papers series


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Date posted: July 23, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Hugh-Jones, David and Zultan, Ro'i, Reputation and Cooperation in Defence (September 22, 2010). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1680785 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1680785

Contact Information

David Hugh-Jones (Contact Author)
University of Essex - Department of Government ( email )
Wivenhoe Park
Colchester CO4 3SQ, CO4 3SQ
United Kingdom
HOME PAGE: http://davidhughjones.googlepages.com
Ro'i Zultan
University College London ( email )
Gower Street
London, WC1E 6BT
United Kingdom
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