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http://ssrn.com/abstract=1693157
 
 

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Work Outside Workplace: Why Am I Working on this Paper at Home?


Victoria Vernon


State University of New York - Empire State College

February 16, 2011


Abstract:     
Using the Work Schedules and Work at Home Supplement to the May 2004 Current Population Survey and the American Time Use Survey 2003-09, I examine the characteristics of employees who perform some work at home, and the link between work at home and wages. I find that the probability and duration of work from home vary substantially by occupation and are positively associated with higher levels of education and longer usual hours of work. Women and married men work at home more often than other groups, whereas hourly workers work from home less. Parents shift work at home away from weekends to weekdays. Consistent with the literature, pooled sample estimates suggest a significant wage premium to telecommuting. However, separate analysis by occupation reveals no wage premium for men and women among non-hourly salary workers in high skills jobs. At the same time, there is a large, up to 20%, premium for paid and unpaid work at home in low skill jobs. Further research is needed to explain this puzzling occupation differential.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 25

Keywords: Time Use, Work From Home, Flexible Schedule, Work-Family Balance

JEL Classification: J22, J30

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Date posted: October 17, 2010 ; Last revised: February 22, 2011

Suggested Citation

Vernon, Victoria, Work Outside Workplace: Why Am I Working on this Paper at Home? (February 16, 2011). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1693157 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1693157

Contact Information

Victoria Vernon (Contact Author)
State University of New York - Empire State College ( email )
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www7.esc.edu/vvernon
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