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The Law Firm and the League: Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, Major League Baseball and Mlb.Com


Ross E. Davies


George Mason University School of Law; The Green Bag

October 27, 2010

Texas Review of Entertainment & Sports Law, Vol. 12, No. 2, Spring 2012
Baseball Research Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2, 2011
George Mason Law & Economics Research Paper No. 10-56

Abstract:     
This is (roughly) the 10th anniversary of the transfer of a unique and valuable baseball property. On September 6, 2000, Major League Baseball and Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP (a very big and very prominent Philadelphia-based international law firm) issued a joint press release announcing “that the law firm has transferred its domain name - mlb.com - to Major League Baseball.” From today’s perspective in the current age of the Internet, looking back at a time when the rise of that age (or at least its angle of ascent) was not at all clear, it seems like a bizarrely fortuitous set of coincidences:

• In 1994, the initials of big-time baseball (Major League Baseball = MLB) and the initials of one of big-time baseball’s longtime, big-time outside law firms (Morgan, Lewis & Bockius = MLB) were the same (and still are); and

• In 1994, it was the law firm that had the foresight, or luck, to move relatively early to register the mlb.com Internet domain name. And then . . .

• Several years later, in 2000, when Major League Baseball started to aggressively market itself on the Internet, Morgan Lewis & Bockius was, for a variety of reasons described below, willing to part with mlb.com for a song, or perhaps even less.

At the time of its consummation, the mlb.com transaction got a lot of attention in the news media, as well it might. Because by 2000, it was obvious that the Internet was big business, and transactions in Internet domain names were sufficiently common and significant to inspire government regulation of that market. But even in the new and booming and volatile domain-name market, the mlb.com deal qualified as unusual in at least two respects. The deal also illustrates the difficulty of placing a value on a favor, at least between lawyer and client, in the context of the business of baseball.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 11

Keywords: Brand, Bud Selig, Frank Coonelly, Howard Ganz, Labor, MLBPA, Management, Marketing, Outside Counsel, Peter Seitz, Players Association, Proskauer Rose, Randy Levine, Robert Manfred, Silverman, Sonia Sotomayor, Sports Illustrated, Steve Garvey, Union, Website, Wilkie Farr Gallagher, World Classic

JEL Classification: K2, K21, K23, K40

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Date posted: October 28, 2010 ; Last revised: May 25, 2012

Suggested Citation

Davies, Ross E., The Law Firm and the League: Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, Major League Baseball and Mlb.Com (October 27, 2010). Texas Review of Entertainment & Sports Law, Vol. 12, No. 2, Spring 2012; Baseball Research Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2, 2011; George Mason Law & Economics Research Paper No. 10-56. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1698930

Contact Information

Ross E. Davies (Contact Author)
George Mason University School of Law ( email )
3301 Fairfax Drive
Arlington, VA 22201
United States
The Green Bag ( email )
6600 Barnaby St., NW
Washington, DC 20015
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.greenbag.org
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