Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1702469
 


 



Racial Disparities in Injection-Related HIV: A Case Study of Toxic Law


Scott Burris


Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law

Evan D. Anderson


Center for Public Health Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania; Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law

Ave Craigg


Temple University Beasley School of Law

Corey S. Davis


Network for Public Health Law

Patricia Case


Fenway Community Health

November 3, 2010

Temple Law Review, Vol. 82, No. 5, pp. 1263-1307, 2011
Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2011-34

Abstract:     
Racial minorities suffer disproportionately high rates of almost all major diseases including heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Few diseases reflect this process as clearly as HIV/AIDS. Since its emergence in the early 1980s, the incidence of HIV has been higher for African Americans than any other racial or ethnic group in the United States. Although African Americans only comprise about 13% of the United States population, they account for almost half of the people who get HIV and AIDS each year. The disparity in HIV between African American drug users and white drug users is among the most shocking in the country: African Americans who inject drugs are ten times more likely to contract HIV/AIDS than white injectors. This paper considers the disparity in HIV among injecting drug users and what the law has to do with it. It begins by summarizing the evidence on two key points: that criminal laws and law enforcement practices have fueled disparities in HIV among IDUs, and that syringe access programs (SEPs) can prevent HIV among drug users without increasing drug use or other social problems. In the heart of the legal story, this paper focuses on an area where immediate and dramatic change could and should happen within the national HIV prevention strategy and in the legislative agendas of state legislatures. In spite of the evidence and nearly two decades of experience, access to sterile syringes through SEPs and pharmacies remains the undernourished step-child of HIV prevention. Politics and ideology and the overall scarcity of prevention funding explain part of this, but as an immediate barrier to syringe access and SEPs the law stands out both for its force and as an example of how disparities happen. We explain the various federal, state and local restrictions on the implementation of SEPs. If we are serious about reducing racial disparities in HIV, we should make syringes available at pharmacies and syringe exchanges at a level and in the places necessary to reach black IDUs, which means removing legal barriers, scaling up programs and services, and eliminating harassment and other police practices that discourage IDUs from carrying syringes and depress the effectiveness of SEPs.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 47

Keywords: HIV, Syringe Exchange, Pharmacy Law, Public Health Law

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: November 5, 2010 ; Last revised: November 4, 2011

Suggested Citation

Burris, Scott and Anderson, Evan D. and Craigg, Ave and Davis, Corey S. and Case, Patricia, Racial Disparities in Injection-Related HIV: A Case Study of Toxic Law (November 3, 2010). Temple Law Review, Vol. 82, No. 5, pp. 1263-1307, 2011; Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2011-34. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1702469

Contact Information

Scott C. Burris
Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )
1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
215-204-6576 (Phone)
215-204-1185 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.temple.edu/lawschool/phrhcs/index.html
Evan D. Anderson (Contact Author)
Center for Public Health Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania ( email )
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States
2159000359 (Phone)
Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )
1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
Ave Craigg
Temple University Beasley School of Law ( email )
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
Corey S. Davis
Network for Public Health Law ( email )
Saint Paul, MN
United States
Patricia Case
Fenway Community Health ( email )
800 Boylston Street
4th Floor
Boston, MA 02199
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 945
Downloads: 110
Download Rank: 141,338

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo5 in 0.422 seconds