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'You Have the Right to an Attorney', but Not Right Now: Combating Miranda’s Failure by Advancing the Point of Attachment Under Article XII of the Massachusetts Declaration of Rights


D. Christopher Dearborn


Suffolk University Law School

June 6, 2011

Suffolk University Law Review, Vol. 44, p. 359, 2011
Suffolk University Law School Research Paper No. 10-64

Abstract:     
Forty years of history has clearly demonstrated that Miranda v. Arizona has completely failed to honor its objectives. In this article, I examine Miranda’s failure by exposing its mythology. Then, I propose a novel solution for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, inviting the Supreme Judicial Court (‘SJC’) to advance the point where the right to counsel attaches from arraignment to arrest, or at the very latest, prior to the commencement of custodial interrogation. I argue that this proposal is socially justified, a logical extension of the principles embodied in article 12 of the Massachusetts Declaration of rights, and consistent with the SJC’s bold and courageous history of departing from Supreme Court jurisprudence by providing greater protections to the citizens of Massachusetts.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 57

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Date posted: December 16, 2010 ; Last revised: June 13, 2011

Suggested Citation

Dearborn, D. Christopher, 'You Have the Right to an Attorney', but Not Right Now: Combating Miranda’s Failure by Advancing the Point of Attachment Under Article XII of the Massachusetts Declaration of Rights (June 6, 2011). Suffolk University Law Review, Vol. 44, p. 359, 2011; Suffolk University Law School Research Paper No. 10-64. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1725546

Contact Information

D. Christopher Dearborn (Contact Author)
Suffolk University Law School ( email )
120 Tremont Street
Boston, MA 02108-4977
United States
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