Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1740767
 
 

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The Politics of Social Policy in America: The Causes and Effects of Indirect Versus Direct Social Spending


Christopher G. Faricy


Washington State University

January 1, 2011

The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 1, pp. 74-83, January 2011

Abstract:     
The United States has a divided social system in that both the public and private sectors provide citizens with benefits and services. The effects of political party control on public social policy are widely known. An area of study less understood is how partisanship influences private social benefits. I develop and test a theory that political parties' choice between indirect and direct social expenditures is primarily motivated by a desire to alter the balance between public and private power in society. First, I find no statistically conclusive evidence that Democratic control of the federal government results in higher levels of total social spending. Additionally, my results show that Republican control of the legislature results in a higher ratio of indirect to direct social spending. These results have implications for determining the beneficiaries of social benefits and economic inequality.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 10

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Date posted: January 16, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Faricy, Christopher G., The Politics of Social Policy in America: The Causes and Effects of Indirect Versus Direct Social Spending (January 1, 2011). The Journal of Politics, Vol. 73, No. 1, pp. 74-83, January 2011. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1740767

Contact Information

Christopher Faricy (Contact Author)
Washington State University ( email )
Wilson Rd.
College of Business
Pullman, WA 99164
United States
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