Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1774802
 


 



Individual, Multiple and Collective Ownership - What Impact on Competition?


Reto Hilty


Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition; University of Zurich; Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

March 2, 2011

INDIVIDUALISM AND COLLECTIVIZATION IN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW, p. 3-44, Jan Rosén, Edward Elgar, 2012
Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property & Competition Law Research Paper No. 11-04

Abstract:     
IP law, as a matter of principle, allocates the subject matter of protection to owners. However, different forms of ownership are possible, either based on specific legal arrangements (e.g. co-authorship) or as a result of contractual arrangements. Depending on the circumstances in a particular case, the impacts of different forms of ownership on competition vary. The more open a system of ownership turns out to be for third parties, the less we are faced with negative competitive impacts, and the more likely new innovations or creations will occur.

At the same time, open systems are not in conflict with IP law - on the contrary. Based on the power to prohibit use activities entirely, right holders alternatively may allow for certain uses under specific conditions. Notably, the requirement to keep a system open in cases of creative or inventive uses of the subject matter of protection (e.g. such as the creative commons licenses) would not be enforceable without IP rights. Open systems therewith constitute special licensing regimes ultimately providing for more innovation and creation.

All the same, incentives to choose an open systems are weak. IP rights are hardly enforced by the creators or inventors themselves, but rather by the marketers of IP-related products. Such marketers, however, have strong incentives to pursue proprietary systems avoiding competition, and therewith increasing their own profits. Hence, IP rights risk displaying dysfunctional effects, notably prohibiting new creations or innovations. Such dysfunctional effects may be prevented, or at least limited, by provisions facilitating (compulsory) licensing.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 42

Keywords: exclusive right, intellectual property, ownership, competition, patent law, copyright law, trademark law, geographical indications, unfair competition, open access, open source, open innovation, compulsory license

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Date posted: May 18, 2011 ; Last revised: May 16, 2012

Suggested Citation

Hilty, Reto, Individual, Multiple and Collective Ownership - What Impact on Competition? (March 2, 2011). INDIVIDUALISM AND COLLECTIVIZATION IN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW, p. 3-44, Jan Rosén, Edward Elgar, 2012; Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property & Competition Law Research Paper No. 11-04. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1774802

Contact Information

Reto Hilty (Contact Author)
Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition ( email )
Marstallplatz 1
Munich, 80539
Germany
HOME PAGE: http://www.ip.mpg.de
University of Zurich
Rämistrasse 74/7
Zürich, CH-8001
Switzerland
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Munich, 80539
Germany
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