Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1798987
 


 



Injunctions Enforcing Negative Covenants in Personal Service Contracts: A Critical Assessment of Contemporary Developments


Joellen Riley


University of Sydney - Faculty of Law

2009

Presented at Melbourne Law School Remedies Conference, December 11, 2009
Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 11/25

Abstract:     
Once upon a time, it was safe to assume that a court exercising equitable jurisdiction would not enforce a personal services contract in such a way as to preclude a person from pursuing a career indefinitely. The Sonny Bill Williams case (Bulldogs Rugby League Club v. Williams [2008] NSWSC 822) challenged that assumption. How have we reached the point where an injunction – rather than damages – has come to be the customary remedy for certain breaches of service contracts? And is it time for a careful reassessment of fundamental principles, to ensure that Equity is not complicit in attempts to commodify and enslave labour?

Number of Pages in PDF File: 13

Keywords: injunctions, restrictive covenants, employment contracts

JEL Classification: K10, K30, K31

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Date posted: April 1, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Riley, Joellen, Injunctions Enforcing Negative Covenants in Personal Service Contracts: A Critical Assessment of Contemporary Developments (2009). Presented at Melbourne Law School Remedies Conference, December 11, 2009; Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 11/25. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1798987

Contact Information

Joellen Riley (Contact Author)
University of Sydney - Faculty of Law ( email )
Faculty of Law Building, F10
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia
+61 2 9351 0205 (Phone)
+61 2 9351 0200 (Fax)
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