Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1802833
 
 

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How Much Better are the Most Prestigious Journals? The Statistics of Academic Publication


William H. Starbuck


University of Oregon - Charles H. Lundquist School of Business; New York University (NYU) - Department of Management and Organizational Behavior

April 4, 2005

Organization Science, Vol. 16, pp. 180-200, 2005

Abstract:     
Articles in high-prestige journals receive more citations and more applause than articles in less-prestigious journals, but how much more do these articles contribute to knowledge?
This article uses a statistical theory of review processes to draw inferences about differences value between articles in more-prestigious versus less-prestigious journals. This analysis indicates that there is much overlap in articles in different prestige strata. Indeed, theory implies that about half of the articles published are not among the best ones submitted to those journals, and some of the manuscripts that belong in the highest-value 20% have the misfortune to elicit rejections from as many as five journals.

Some social science departments and business schools strongly emphasize publication in prestigious journals. Although one can draw inferences about an author’s average manuscript from the percentage in top-tier journals, the confidence limits for such inferences are wide. A focus on prestigious journals may benefit the most prestigious departments or schools but add randomness to the decisions of departments or schools that are not at the very top. Such a focus may also impede the development of knowledge when mediocre research receives the endorsement of high visibility.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 21

Keywords: citations, journals, knowledge, peer review, personnel evaluation, research, reviewing

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Date posted: April 7, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Starbuck, William H., How Much Better are the Most Prestigious Journals? The Statistics of Academic Publication (April 4, 2005). Organization Science, Vol. 16, pp. 180-200, 2005. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1802833

Contact Information

William H. Starbuck (Contact Author)
University of Oregon - Charles H. Lundquist School of Business ( email )
1208 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1208
United States
New York University (NYU) - Department of Management and Organizational Behavior ( email )
44 West 4th Street
New York, NY 10012
United States
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