Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1810833
 
 

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Who Stands at the Top and Bottom of the Slippery Slope?


Tim Brown


University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Accountancy

Kristina M. Rennekamp


Cornell University - Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management

Nicholas Seybert


University of Maryland - Department of Accounting & Information Assurance

Wenjie Zhu


University of Maryland - Department of Accounting & Information Assurance

February 22, 2014


Abstract:     
Prior research argues that sequential opportunities to cheat lead to unethical slippery slope behavior, with limited evidence to support such claims. We use two experiments to demonstrate the existence slippery slope behavior and investigate how it leads “good people” (low-Machiavellians) to do “bad things.” Our first experiment manipulates whether incentives to misreport increase or decrease across two tasks. We find that smaller initial incentives to misreport followed by larger subsequent incentives lead to greater subsequent misreporting by low-Machiavellians. High-Machiavellians do not exhibit this slippery slope behavior. Our second experiment manipulates the length of time between tasks to examine whether the effects of misreporting incentives on slippery slope behavior diminish as opportunities to misreport are separated. We again observe slippery slope behavior among low-Ms at the short horizon, but not at the long horizon. Our study confirms the existence of a slippery slope toward unethical behavior, highlights differences along an important personality trait, and suggests that slippery slope behavior is magnified when there are frequent opportunities to misreport.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 29

Keywords: slippery slope, misconduct, fraud, moral reasoning, Machiavellianism, cognitive dissonance

JEL Classification: M00, K00, K20, M10, M14, M40, M41

working papers series


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Date posted: April 16, 2011 ; Last revised: April 23, 2014

Suggested Citation

Brown, Tim and Rennekamp, Kristina M. and Seybert, Nicholas and Zhu, Wenjie, Who Stands at the Top and Bottom of the Slippery Slope? (February 22, 2014). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1810833 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1810833

Contact Information

Tim Brown
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Department of Accountancy ( email )
1206 South Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
United States
Kristina M. Rennekamp
Cornell University - Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management ( email )
401P - Sage Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
United States
607-255-0500 (Phone)

Nicholas Seybert (Contact Author)
University of Maryland - Department of Accounting & Information Assurance ( email )
Robert H. Smith School of Business
College Park, MD 20742-9157
United States
Wenjie Zhu
University of Maryland - Department of Accounting & Information Assurance ( email )
Robert H. Smith School of Business
College Park, MD 20742-9157
United States
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