Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1817535
 


 



Schoenberg, Serialism and Cognition: Whose Fault If No One Listens?


Philip Ball


affiliation not provided to SSRN

March 2011

Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Vol. 36, No. 1, 2011

Abstract:     
Atonal compositions based on the 12-tone method devised by Arnold Schoenberg remain, in some cases a century after they were written, largely unpopular with music audiences. Research on the science of music cognition may now offer some clues to why this is. Schoenberg's method of atonal composition actively undermines some of the basic cognitive principles that allow our brains to turn notes into music. Unless 12-tone music is granted other aids to cognition, it may thus fail to create a cognitively coherent auditory experience, but becomes a mere collection of sounds.

Keywords: Music, Cognition, Perception, Atonality, Psychology

Accepted Paper Series





Not Available For Download

Date posted: April 25, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Ball, Philip, Schoenberg, Serialism and Cognition: Whose Fault If No One Listens? (March 2011). Interdisciplinary Science Reviews, Vol. 36, No. 1, 2011. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1817535

Contact Information

Philip Ball (Contact Author)
affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 530

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.250 seconds