Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1838709
 
 

Citations (2)



 


 



Handcuffing the Cops? A Thirty Year Perspective on Miranda’s Effects on Law Enforcement


Paul G. Cassell


University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

Richard Fowles


University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law

April 1998

Stanford Law Review, Vol. 50, p. 1055, April 1998

Abstract:     
Critics charged that the Supreme Court’s 1966 decision in Miranda v. Arizona would “handcuff the cops.” Were critics’ concerns justified? This Article, using FBI data, finds that national crime clearance rates fell precipitously in the two years immediately after Miranda and have remained at lower levels in the decades since. Multiple regression analysis further reveals that rising crime rates and the aging baby-boom generation do not account for much of this decline in clearance rates. Rather, as this Article concludes, Miranda has in fact “handcuffed” the police, and society should begin to explore ways of loosening these shackles.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 91

Keywords: Victim, Crime Victim, Impact Statements, Criminal Justice, Sentencing

JEL Classification: K14, K41, K42

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: May 13, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Cassell, Paul G. and Fowles, Richard, Handcuffing the Cops? A Thirty Year Perspective on Miranda’s Effects on Law Enforcement (April 1998). Stanford Law Review, Vol. 50, p. 1055, April 1998. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1838709

Contact Information

Paul G. Cassell (Contact Author)
University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )
332 S. 1400 East Front
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0730
United States
801-585-5202 (Phone)
801-581-6897 (Fax)

Richard Fowles
University of Utah - S.J. Quinney College of Law ( email )
332 S. 1400 East Front
Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0730
United States

Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 702
Downloads: 63
Download Rank: 207,454
Citations:  2

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo8 in 0.218 seconds