Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1841256
 
 

References (33)



 


 



Employees' Perceptions of the Opportunities to Utilize Their Competences: Exploring the Role of Perceived Competence Mobilization


Linda Lai


affiliation not provided to SSRN

June 2011

International Journal of Training and Development, Vol. 15, Issue 2, pp. 140-157, 2011

Abstract:     
Perceived competence mobilization is the degree to which employees perceive that they have adequate opportunities to utilize their competences in their current jobs. The findings of the research reported here suggest that employees' perceived competence mobilization is associated with a number of favourable employee attitudes, including intrinsic motivation, organizational commitment and intention to stay with the organization. Findings based on cross-sectional data from 881 public workers indicate that perceived competence mobilization better predicts relevant employee attitudes than any of the other variables included. The indicated effect of perceived competence mobilization on intrinsic motivation overpowers the effect of self-efficacy (perceived competence), one of the core variables of self-determination theory. Perceived competence mobilization also appears to mediate many relationships involving self-efficacy or perceived training opportunities. Hence, continued research into this construct is of potential value to researchers and organizations.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 18

Accepted Paper Series





Date posted: May 20, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Lai, Linda, Employees' Perceptions of the Opportunities to Utilize Their Competences: Exploring the Role of Perceived Competence Mobilization (June 2011). International Journal of Training and Development, Vol. 15, Issue 2, pp. 140-157, 2011. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1841256 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2419.2011.00376.x

Contact Information

Linda Lai (Contact Author)
affiliation not provided to SSRN
No Address Available
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 322
Downloads: 1
References:  33

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo1 in 0.297 seconds