Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1865497
 
 

Footnotes (92)



 


 



Native Nations and Museums: Developing an Institutional Framework for Cultural Sovereignty


Rebecca A. Tsosie


Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law

2009

Tulsa Law Review, Vol. 45, No. 1, p. 3, Fall 2009

Abstract:     
This article examines the changing relationships between museums and indigenous peoples over the past two centuries, with a specific focus upon the relationship of American museums to Native peoples within the United States. In the 19th century, the role of the American Museum was to acquire objects that could offer knowledge about natural history or world cultures to facilitate certain public values. With respect to Native peoples, the 19th century practices of American museum often institutionalized a hierarchical relationship consistent with the exploitative tenets of European colonialism and Imperialism. In comparison, modern museums must engage the multiple experiences of the diverse groups that are present within the nation-state, as well as disparate populations across the globe. Groups often disagree about the meaning of the past, as well as the articulation of their contemporary identity. In this respect, modern museums often participate in reshaping public values through the combined processes of repatriation and reconciliation. Through the process of repatriation, museums honor the human rights of Native peoples by transferring possession of ancestral human remains and cultural objects that were wrongfully appropriated in the past. Through the process of reconciliation, museums foster new relationships between Native peoples and the nation-state that more accurately reflect their distinctive historical experience and contemporary identity as separate sovereigns. This article argues that museums have an important role to play in the contemporary effort of Native Nations to assert their cultural sovereignty and reclaim their own histories. Specifically, the article examines the role of the National Museum of the American Indian and the role of tribal museums in fostering tribal cultural sovereignty.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 22

Keywords: Native American, Repatriation, Reconciliation, Cultural Sovereignty, Museums

working papers series





Download This Paper

Date posted: June 19, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Tsosie, Rebecca A., Native Nations and Museums: Developing an Institutional Framework for Cultural Sovereignty (2009). Tulsa Law Review, Vol. 45, No. 1, p. 3, Fall 2009. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1865497 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1865497

Contact Information

Rebecca A. Tsosie (Contact Author)
Arizona State University (ASU) - Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law ( email )
Box 877906
Tempe, AZ 85287-7906
United States
480-965-2714 (Phone)
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 351
Downloads: 57
Download Rank: 226,301
Footnotes:  92

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo1 in 0.344 seconds