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http://ssrn.com/abstract=1871503
 
 

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The Tragedy of the Risk-Perception Commons: Culture Conflict, Rationality Conflict, and Climate Change


Dan M. Kahan


Yale University - Law School; Harvard University - Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics

Maggie Wittlin


Columbia University - Law School

Ellen Peters


Ohio State University - Psychology Department; Decision Research; University of Oregon

Paul Slovic


Decision Research; University of Oregon - Department of Psychology

Lisa Larrimore Ouellette


Stanford Law School

Donald Braman


George Washington University - Law School; Cultural Cognition Project

Gregory N. Mandel


Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law

2011

Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2011-26
Cultural Cognition Project Working Paper No. 89
Yale Law & Economics Research Paper No. 435
Yale Law School, Public Law Working Paper No. 230

Abstract:     
The conventional explanation for controversy over climate change emphasizes impediments to public understanding: Limited popular knowledge of science, the inability of ordinary citizens to assess technical information, and the resulting widespread use of unreliable cognitive heuristics to assess risk. A large survey of U.S. adults (N = 1540) found little support for this account. On the whole, the most scientifically literate and numerate subjects were slightly less likely, not more, to see climate change as a serious threat than the least scientifically literate and numerate ones. More importantly, greater scientific literacy and numeracy were associated with greater cultural polarization: Respondents predisposed by their values to dismiss climate change evidence became more dismissive, and those predisposed by their values to credit such evidence more concerned, as science literacy and numeracy increased. We suggest that this evidence reflects a conflict between two levels of rationality: The individual level, which is characterized by citizens’ effective use of their knowledge and reasoning capacities to form risk perceptions that express their cultural commitments; and the collective level, which is characterized by citizens’ failure to converge on the best available scientific evidence on how to promote their common welfare. Dispelling this, “tragedy of the risk-perception commons,” we argue, should be understood as the central aim of the science of science communication.

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Date posted: June 24, 2011 ; Last revised: April 16, 2013

Suggested Citation

Kahan, Dan M. and Wittlin, Maggie and Peters, Ellen and Slovic, Paul and Ouellette, Lisa Larrimore and Braman, Donald and Mandel, Gregory N., The Tragedy of the Risk-Perception Commons: Culture Conflict, Rationality Conflict, and Climate Change (2011). Temple University Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2011-26; Cultural Cognition Project Working Paper No. 89; Yale Law & Economics Research Paper No. 435; Yale Law School, Public Law Working Paper No. 230. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1871503 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1871503

Contact Information

Dan M. Kahan (Contact Author)
Yale University - Law School ( email )
P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.culturalcognition.net/kahan
Harvard University - Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics ( email )
124 Mount Auburn Street
Suite 520N
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Maggie Wittlin
Columbia University - Law School ( email )
435 West 116th Street
New York, NY 10025
United States
Ellen Peters
Ohio State University - Psychology Department ( email )
Blankenship Hall-2010
901 Woody Hayes Drive
Columbus, OH OH 43210
United States
Decision Research ( email )
1201 Oak Street, Suite 200
Eugene, OR 97401
United States
HOME PAGE: http://www.decisionresearch.org
University of Oregon ( email )
1280 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
United States
Paul Slovic
Decision Research ( email )
1201 Oak Street, Suite 200
Eugene, OR 97401
United States
541-485-2400 (Phone)
541-485-2403 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.decisionresearch.org
University of Oregon - Department of Psychology ( email )
Eugene, OR 97403
United States
541-485-2400 (Phone)
Lisa Larrimore Ouellette
Stanford Law School ( email )
559 Nathan Abbott Way
Stanford, CA 94305-8610
United States
HOME PAGE: http://law.stanford.edu/profile/lisa-larrimore-ouellette

Donald Braman
George Washington University - Law School ( email )
2000 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20052
United States
Cultural Cognition Project ( email )
2000 H St NW
2000 H Street
Washington, DC 20052 20052
United States
202-491-8843 (Phone)
202 491-8843 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.culturalcognition.net/braman
Gregory Mandel
Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )
1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States
(215) 204-2381 (Phone)
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