Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1872173
 


 



Nonverbal Cues Associated with Negotiation 'Styles' Across Cultures


Zhaleh Semnani-Azad


University of Waterloo - Department of Psychology

Wendi L. Adair


University of Waterloo - Department of Psychology

June 24, 2011

IACM 24TH Annual Conference Paper

Abstract:     
The current study examines possible miscommunications in cross-cultural negotiation, from a nonverbal communication perspective. We examined cultural variation in nonverbal cues connoting four negotiation styles, associated with the cooperative/competitive dichotomy (Pruitt & Carnevale, 1993; Raiffa, 1982). Canadian and Chinese negotiators were primed with positive or negative evaluation (liking or disliking partner), and dominant or submissive negotiation styles. We found main effects of negotiation approach, where negotiators with a negative and dominant stance, tend to display negative emotion, gesture, occupy space, and engage in high visual dominance. In contrast, negotiators primed with liking or a more submissive negotiation stance were more likely to lean forward, smile, gesture, and exhibit silence. Significant interactions illustrate that Canadian negotiators communicate liking with eye contact, while this same behaviour is associated with dislike for Chinese negotiators. Interestingly, an erect and straight back posture was associated with dominance for Canadian negotiators, while this posture was affiliated with submissiveness amongst Chinese negotiators. Theoretical and practical implications for cross-cultural negotiation and communication are discussed.

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Date posted: June 27, 2011 ; Last revised: June 9, 2013

Suggested Citation

Semnani-Azad, Zhaleh and Adair, Wendi L., Nonverbal Cues Associated with Negotiation 'Styles' Across Cultures (June 24, 2011). IACM 24TH Annual Conference Paper. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1872173 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1872173

Contact Information

Zhaleh Semnani-Azad (Contact Author)
University of Waterloo - Department of Psychology ( email )
200 University Avenue West
Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1
Canada
Wendi L. Adair
University of Waterloo - Department of Psychology ( email )
200 University Avenue West
Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1
Canada
519-888-4567 ext. 38143 (Phone)
519-746-8631 (Fax)
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