Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1916164
 
 

Footnotes (334)



 


 



Fixing Students' Fixed Mindsets: Paving the Way for Meaningful Assessment


Carrie Sperling


University of Wisconsin Law School, Frank J. Remington Center

Susan Shapcott


Arizona State University (ASU)

August 10, 2011

18 Legal Writing the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute 39 (2012)
Univ. of Wisconsin Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1238

Abstract:     
For decades law professors have remained perplexed about students’ responses to the feedback they give. Some students crave constructive criticism and use it to improve their legal analysis and skills. Other students, however, when given the same feedback react defensively, reject the professor’s suggestions and claim that the assessment was unfair. To address this problem, scholarship has focused on developing different ways to give feedback. But no one has explained the underlying cause of why students respond to feedback so diversely.

The explanation of why some students respond well to feedback when others don’t lies in decades of established research in educational psychology. Students respond to feedback in different, yet predictable ways. Students’ reactions to feedback are guided by the implicit beliefs they hold about intelligence - their mindset.

Some students have a fixed mindset. They believe that intelligence is a fixed trait and interpret critical feedback as a negative judgment about their intelligence. Other students have an incremental mindset. They believe that intelligence is malleable and see critical feedback as a tool to get smarter. Based on this research, this article explains how students’ mindsets affect their responses to feedback. This article also suggests ways that law professors can induce an incremental mindset in students and increase the likelihood of students using feedback in adaptive ways.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 48

Keywords: feedback, assessment, mindset, self-efficacy, performance, LSAT, formative assessment, summative assessment, writing, legal writing, learning

Accepted Paper Series





Download This Paper

Date posted: August 24, 2011 ; Last revised: October 15, 2013

Suggested Citation

Sperling, Carrie and Shapcott, Susan, Fixing Students' Fixed Mindsets: Paving the Way for Meaningful Assessment (August 10, 2011). 18 Legal Writing the Journal of the Legal Writing Institute 39 (2012); Univ. of Wisconsin Legal Studies Research Paper No. 1238. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1916164 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1916164

Contact Information

Carrie Sperling (Contact Author)
University of Wisconsin Law School, Frank J. Remington Center ( email )
975 Bascom Mall
Madison, WI 53706
United States
Susan Shapcott
Arizona State University (ASU) ( email )
Farmer Building 440G PO Box 872011
Tempe, AZ 85287
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 704
Downloads: 198
Download Rank: 90,059
Footnotes:  334

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo1 in 0.281 seconds