Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1938524
 
 

References (16)



 


 



Caring About Framing Effects


Amber Bloomfield


Northwestern University

Josh Sager


Northwestern University

Daniel M. Bartels


University of Chicago - Booth School of Business

Douglas L. Medin


affiliation not provided to SSRN

2006

Mind & Society Vol. 5, pp. 123-138, 2006

Abstract:     
We explored the relationship between qualities of victims in hypothetical scenarios and the appearance of framing effects. In past studies, participants’ feelings about the victims have been demonstrated to affect whether framing effects appear, but this relationship has not been directly examined. In the present study, we examined the relationship between caring about the people at risk, the perceived interdependence of the people at risk, and frame. Scenarios were presented that differed in the degree to which participants could be expected to care about the group and the extent to which the group could be construed as interdependent. A framing effect was found only for the scenario describing the victims as the participants’ friends who did not know each other (high caring/low interdependence), and this went in the opposite direction from typical framing effects. Finally, perceived interdependence and caring affected choice both within and across scenarios, with more risky choices made by participants with high interdependence ratings and high caring ratings.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 16

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: October 4, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Bloomfield, Amber and Sager, Josh and Bartels, Daniel M. and Medin, Douglas L., Caring About Framing Effects (2006). Mind & Society Vol. 5, pp. 123-138, 2006. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1938524

Contact Information

Amber Bloomfield
Northwestern University ( email )
2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
Josh Sager
Northwestern University ( email )
2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States
Daniel M. Bartels (Contact Author)
University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )
5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States
Douglas L. Medin
affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 172
Downloads: 10
References:  16

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.297 seconds