Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=194257
 


 



United States Law and China's WTO Accession Process


Sylvia A. Rhodes


affiliation not provided to SSRN

John H. Jackson


Georgetown University Law Center

1999

Journal of International Economic Law, Vol. 2(3), September 1999

Abstract:     
This article surveys the history and background of the People's Republic of China's (PRC) accession to the GATT and the WTO, and analyzes US domestic laws affecting the PRC's accession to the WTO. United States domestic law, known as the Jackson-Vanik amendment, is a legal obstacle to a full WTO relationship between the United States and the PRC, because it requires annual review of the PRC's most-favored nation (MFN) trade status (since 1998 termed 'normal trade relations' status). Recognizing the United States must extend permanent MFN treatment to the PRC to avail itself of all rights under the WTO with respect to the PRC, this article explores the ways in which the US Congress has previously extended permanent MFN treatment to countries subject to the Jackson-Vanik amendment. This article also takes note of proposed US legislation with respect to the PRC's entry into the WTO. Finally, this article concludes that the US Congress plays an important and probably decisive role in ensuring that the United States and the PRC enjoy a full WTO relationship.

Accepted Paper Series





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Date posted: April 10, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Rhodes, Sylvia A. and Jackson, John H., United States Law and China's WTO Accession Process (1999). Journal of International Economic Law, Vol. 2(3), September 1999. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=194257

Contact Information

Sylvia A. Rhodes
affiliation not provided to SSRN
John H. Jackson (Contact Author)
Georgetown University Law Center ( email )
600 New Jersey Avenue, NW
McDonough Hall, Room 456
Washington, DC 20001
United States
202-662-9837 (Phone)
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