Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1959602
 
 

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L Street: Bagehotian Prescriptions for a 21st-Century Money Market


George Selgin


University of Georgia

December 8, 2011

Cato Journal, Forthcoming

Abstract:     
In Lombard Street Walter Bagehot offered some second-best suggestions, informed by the crisis of 1866, for reforming the Bank of England’s conduct during financial crises. Here I respond to the crisis of 2008 by proposing changes, in the spirit of Bagehot’s own, to the Federal Reserve’s operating framework. These changes are aimed at reducing the Fed’s interference with the efficient allocation of credit, as well as its temptation to treat certain financial institutions as Too Big to Fail, during crises. More fundamentally, they seek to ground Fed operations more firmly in the rule of law, and to thereby make them less subject to the whims of committees, by allowing a fixed but flexible operating framework to serve the Fed’s needs during financial crises as well as in normal times.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 35

Keywords: Walter Bagehot, Lender of Last Resort, Open-Market Operations, Primary Dealers, Treasuries Only

JEL Classification: E58, G01

working papers series


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Date posted: May 31, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Selgin, George, L Street: Bagehotian Prescriptions for a 21st-Century Money Market (December 8, 2011). Cato Journal, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1959602 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1959602

Contact Information

George Selgin (Contact Author)
University of Georgia ( email )
Athens, GA 30602-6254
United States
706-542-2734 (Phone)
706-542-3376 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.terry.uga.edu/~selgin/
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