Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1986509
 


 



Drone Defense: The Inherent Right of Self-Defense and U.S. Drone Strikes in Pakistan


Benedict Woit


University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - School of Law - J.D., 2011

June 6, 2011


Abstract:     
This paper examines the ongoing U.S. drone campaign against militant groups in Pakistan in the context of the inherent right of self-defense and customary international law. The paper provides some brief background information on drones and their technical capabilities and outlines the history of the U.S. drone campaign in Pakistan. The paper examines the parameters of self-defense under Article 51 of the U.N. Charter as well as customary international law and evaluates drone strikes in Pakistan in this context.

To the extent that the U.S. drone campaign clashes with current International Court of Justice interpretations of the law of self-defense, this paper distinguishes the conflict in Pakistan and posits that the restrictive requirements of state attribution and consent are untenable in light of the new realities presented in a 21st century asymmetrical war against non-state militant and terrorist groups.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 25

Keywords: drones, Pakistan, terrorism, Article 51, self defense

working papers series


Download This Paper

Date posted: January 18, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Woit, Benedict, Drone Defense: The Inherent Right of Self-Defense and U.S. Drone Strikes in Pakistan (June 6, 2011). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1986509 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1986509

Contact Information

Benedict Woit (Contact Author)
University of Minnesota - Twin Cities - School of Law - J.D., 2011 ( email )
229 19th Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55455
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 901
Downloads: 265
Download Rank: 62,817

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.422 seconds