Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=199353
 
 

References (135)



 
 

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Questioning Children: The Effects Of Suggestive And Repeated Questioning


Thomas D. Lyon


University of Southern California - Gould School of Law; University of Southern California - Department of Psychology

August 1999

SUGGESTIBILITY OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS, J. Conte, Ed., Sage Publishing, Thousand Oaks, CA

Abstract:     
This is a critical review of several of the most extensively researched issues regarding children's suggestibility. I discuss the research on suggestive questions, repeated questions, and repeated interviews. For each topic I isolate the factors that make children more or less suggestible, in order to facilitate consideration of the applicability of the research to individual cases. I highlight how the research may be interpreted in different ways, leading one to be less skeptical of children's reports than is currently the norm.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 69

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Date posted: January 7, 2000  

Suggested Citation

Lyon, Thomas D., Questioning Children: The Effects Of Suggestive And Repeated Questioning (August 1999). SUGGESTIBILITY OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS, J. Conte, Ed., Sage Publishing, Thousand Oaks, CA. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=199353 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.199353

Contact Information

Thomas D. Lyon (Contact Author)
University of Southern California - Gould School of Law ( email )
699 Exposition Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States
213-740-0142 (Phone)
213-740-5502 (Fax)

University of Southern California - Department of Psychology ( email )
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States
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Downloads: 364
Download Rank: 18,245
References:  135
Citations:  1
Footnotes:  17

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