Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2001068
 


 



Gang Intervention in the United States: Legal and Extra-Legal Attempts at Peacemaking


SpearIt


Texas Southern University - Thurgood Marshall School of Law


Peacemaking: From Practice to Theory, Susan Allen Nan, Zachariah Cherian Mampilly, Andrea Bartoli, Eds., Praeger (2011)

Abstract:     
This chapter examines legalistic interventions in criminal justice as well as non-legal community and cultural forces including music, religion, and the work of current and ex-gang members, all of which have been tapped to help broker peace in the annals of American gang history at one time or other. Although such peacemaking efforts have proven popular, they can be counterproductive. Criminal justice intervention has proven suppressive and suspect in communities where police brutality and racial profiling are systemic. Likewise, cultural strategies can complicate peacemaking efforts and can even provide justification for violence. Music and religion have been used to justify divinely willed destruction, which seemingly contradicts the idea of “intervention.” The chapter concludes by commenting on future prospects for peacemaking through gang-intervention efforts. As a normative note of caution, this part tempers faith in intervention strategies since, the very forces propagating peace can just as easily provoke violence. Moreover, peacemaking is complicated by criminal justice policies at both federal and state levels; some of the war in gangland is due to government policies which directly contribute to increased gang membership and activity. Finally, in addition to these obstacles, the chapter asserts that intervention strategy must contend with prison gangs and how they factor into peacemaking on the streets. The role of prison gangs has been overlooked in long-term strategies for interventionist success, yet it may be that peacemaking is possible only under an arrangement that works in tandem with prison gangs.This proposition is not a capitulation to collusion with gang structures, but encapsulates the raw power of prison gangs to disrupt any interventionist strategy at will, the acknowledgment of which might lead to more effective intervention strategies based on a more holistic understanding of the gang problem.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 18

Keywords: Gangs, Intervention, Criminal Justice, Culture, Prison Gangs, Peacemaking

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: August 3, 2010 ; Last revised: February 28, 2014

Suggested Citation

SpearIt, Gang Intervention in the United States: Legal and Extra-Legal Attempts at Peacemaking. Peacemaking: From Practice to Theory, Susan Allen Nan, Zachariah Cherian Mampilly, Andrea Bartoli, Eds., Praeger (2011). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2001068

Contact Information

SpearIt (Contact Author)
Texas Southern University - Thurgood Marshall School of Law ( email )
3100 Cleburne Street
Houston, TX 77004
United States
713-313-7276 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://www.tsulaw.edu/faculty/profiles/SpearIt/main_profile.html
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 653
Downloads: 71
Download Rank: 193,059

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo2 in 0.360 seconds