Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2013278
 


 



Historic Preservation and its Cultured Despisers: Reflections on the Contemporary Role of Preservation Law in Urban Development


J. Peter Byrne


Georgetown University - Law Center

February 29, 2012

George Mason Law Review, Vol. 19, 2012
Georgetown Public Law Research Paper No. 12-021
Georgetown Law and Economics Research Paper No. 12-007

Abstract:     
The past years have seen widely noticed critiques of historic preservation by “one of our leading urban economists,” Edward Glaeser, and by star architect Rem Koolhaas. Glaeser, an academic economist specializing in urban development, admits that preservation has value. But he argues in his invigorating book, Triumph of the City, and in a contemporaneous article, Preservation Follies, that historic preservation restricts too much development, raises prices, and undermines the vitality of the cities. Koolhaas is a Pritzker Prize-winning architect and oracular theorist of the relation between architecture and culture. In his New York exhibit, Cronocaos, he argued that preservation lacks an organizing theory, imposes inauthentic consumer-friendly glosses on older structures, and inhibits architectural creativity. Although these critiques are as different as the cultural spaces inhabited by their authors (although both are professors at Harvard), both seemed to strike nerves, suggesting an underlying unease about how large a role preservation has come to play in urban development. This article assesses these critiques as part of an ongoing effort to make sense of historic preservation law.

This article proceeds as follows: First, it presents Glaeser’s critique in detail, placing it within the context of his larger argument about what makes cities attractive and dynamic. Grappling with the strengths and weaknesses of Glaeser’s critique leads to a discussion of how preservation regulation actually works and clarification of some of the benefits it confers. Second, this Article will attempt to specify Koolhaas’s critique, connecting it to similar complaints about preservation by more linear thinkers. Weighing objections to the coherence or authenticity of preservation leads to further discussion of the role that preservation plays in the larger culture. This article concludes with a call for future research.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 19

Keywords: historic preservation and conservation, housing law, land use planning, property law and real estate, urban community and regional planning

JEL Classification: K30, K39, K00

working papers series


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Date posted: March 1, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Byrne, J. Peter, Historic Preservation and its Cultured Despisers: Reflections on the Contemporary Role of Preservation Law in Urban Development (February 29, 2012). George Mason Law Review, Vol. 19, 2012; Georgetown Public Law Research Paper No. 12-021; Georgetown Law and Economics Research Paper No. 12-007. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2013278 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2013278

Contact Information

J. Peter Byrne (Contact Author)
Georgetown University - Law Center ( email )
600 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001
United States
(202)662-9066 (Phone)
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