Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2027543
 
 

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Should Google Search Be Regulated as a Public Utility?


Mark A Jamison


University of Florida - Warrington College of Business Administration, Public Utility Research Center

March 17, 2012


Abstract:     
I examine the validity of the arguments for regulating Google search and find that they are insufficient and that regulation would likely be counterproductive. Google search does not fit the traditional frameworks for justifying regulatory control, namely, the public utility concept, common carrier concept, and essential facilities doctrine. For example, Google’s search is not monopolistic in nature, does not preclude rivals from competing against Google, does not rely upon grant of a franchise as does a utility, and does not take control of rivals’ content or service. Furthermore, the advocates for regulation fail to give adequate weight to the changes that constantly occur in the search business, the ways that rivals benefit from Google’s investments, the negative impacts of forcing Google to reveal its search algorithms, and regulation’s stifling effect on innovation.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 28

JEL Classification: K21, K23, L12, L13, L42, L51

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Date posted: March 25, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Jamison, Mark A, Should Google Search Be Regulated as a Public Utility? (March 17, 2012). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2027543 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2027543

Contact Information

Mark A. Jamison (Contact Author)
University of Florida - Warrington College of Business Administration, Public Utility Research Center ( email )
PO Box 117142
Gainesville, FL 32611
United States
352-392-6148 (Phone)
352-392-7796 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://warrington.ufl.edu/purc/facultyinfo.asp?WEBID=1217
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