Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2039600
 


 



The Medicalization of Chronic Disease and Costs


Kenneth E. Thorpe


Emory University - Department of Health Policy and Management

Meredith Philyaw


Emory University

April 2012

Annual Review of Public Health, Vol. 33, pp. 409-423, 2012

Abstract:     
U.S. health care spending has increased dramatically in the past several decades, consuming 17.6% percent ($2.6 trillion) of GDP in 2010. Although historical spending drivers do not account for this recent increase, two major changes in population health - the rise in obesity and obesity-related chronic disease - provide a likely explanation. This article reviews the contribution that rising treated obesity-related chronic disease prevalence and its associated treatment (spending per treated case) has made to the growth in health care spending. We discuss trends in the clinical incidence of obesity and chronic disease as well as timely advancements in disease detection, treatment, and management. Evidence shows that rising obesity rates are influencing spending largely by increasing the treated prevalence of obesity-related chronic disease. Therefore, preventing individuals from becoming treated cases in the first place is one key way that our country can cut health care spending moving forward.

Accepted Paper Series


Not Available For Download

Date posted: April 16, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Thorpe, Kenneth E. and Philyaw, Meredith, The Medicalization of Chronic Disease and Costs (April 2012). Annual Review of Public Health, Vol. 33, pp. 409-423, 2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2039600 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031811-124652

Contact Information

Kenneth E. Thorpe (Contact Author)
Emory University - Department of Health Policy and Management ( email )
1518 Clifton Road NE
Rollins School of Public Health
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States
404-727-3487 (Phone)
404-727-9198 (Fax)
Meredith Philyaw
Emory University ( email )
Atlanta, GA 30322
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 470

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo6 in 0.250 seconds