Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2051324
 
 

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Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation


David Hsu


National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Patrick O’Donoughue


affiliation not provided to SSRN

Vasilis Fthenakis


Columbia University - Earth and Environmental Engineering Department

Garvin A. Heath


National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

Hyung Chul Kim


Ford Research and Innovation Center

Pamala Sawyer


affiliation not provided to SSRN

Jun‐Ki Choi


affiliation not provided to SSRN

Damon E. Turney


affiliation not provided to SSRN

April 2012

Journal of Industrial Ecology, Vol. 16, pp. S122-S135, 2012

Abstract:     
Published scientific literature contains many studies estimating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of residential and utility‐scale solar photovoltaics (PVs). Despite the volume of published work, variability in results hinders generalized conclusions. Most variance between studies can be attributed to differences in methods and assumptions. To clarify the published results for use in decision making and other analyses, we conduct a meta‐analysis of existing studies, harmonizing key performance characteristics to produce more comparable and consistently derived results. Screening 397 life cycle assessments (LCAs) relevant to PVs yielded 13 studies on crystalline silicon (c‐Si) that met minimum standards of quality, transparency, and relevance. Prior to harmonization, the median of 42 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from those 13 LCAs was 57 grams carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt‐hour (g CO‐eq/kWh), with an interquartile range (IQR) of 44 to 73. After harmonizing key performance characteristics (irradiation of 1,700 kilowatt‐hours per square meter per year (kWh/m2/yr); system lifetime of 30 years; module efficiency of 13.2% or 14.0%, depending on module type; and a performance ratio of 0.75 or 0.80, depending on installation, the median estimate decreased to 45 and the IQR tightened to 39 to 49. The median estimate and variability were reduced compared to published estimates mainly because of higher average assumptions for irradiation and system lifetime. For the sample of studies evaluated, harmonization effectively reduced variability, providing a clearer synopsis of the life cycle GHG emissions from c‐Si PVs. The literature used in this harmonization neither covers all possible c‐Si installations nor represents the distribution of deployed or manufactured c‐Si PVs.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 14

Keywords: global warming, industrial ecology, renewable energy, life cycle assessment (LCA), meta‐analysis, solar

Accepted Paper Series


Date posted: May 5, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Hsu, David and O’Donoughue, Patrick and Fthenakis, Vasilis and Heath, Garvin A. and Kim, Hyung Chul and Sawyer, Pamala and Choi, Jun‐Ki and Turney, Damon E., Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation (April 2012). Journal of Industrial Ecology, Vol. 16, pp. S122-S135, 2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2051324 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-9290.2011.00439.x

Contact Information

David Hsu
National Renewable Energy Laboratory ( email )
1617 Cole Blvd.
Golden, CO 80401-3393
United States
Patrick O’Donoughue
affiliation not provided to SSRN
No Address Available
Vasilis Fthenakis
Columbia University - Earth and Environmental Engineering Department
3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States
Garvin A. Heath
National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) ( email )
1617 Cole Blvd.
Golden, CO 80401-3393
United States
Hyung Chul Kim
Ford Research and Innovation Center ( email )
2101 Village Road
Dearborn, MI 48124
United States
Pamala Sawyer
affiliation not provided to SSRN
Jun‐Ki Choi
affiliation not provided to SSRN
No Address Available
Damon E. Turney
affiliation not provided to SSRN
No Address Available
Feedback to SSRN


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References:  49
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