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The Self-Judging WTO Security Exception


Roger Paul Alford


Notre Dame Law School

June 7, 2012

2011 Utah Law Review 697
Notre Dame Legal Studies Paper No. 2079608

Abstract:     
This Article analyzes the WTO security exception, with a particular focus on State practice. In the absence of any GATT or WTO jurisprudence, State practice affords the best vehicle to understand the meaning of Article XXI. In the few instances when invocation of the security exception has been challenged, State practice suggests that the security exception is not judicially reviewable.

A critical question emerges from this analysis of State practice. If a Member State can avoid WTO obligations through a self-judging security exception, what is to prevent bad faith invocations? The WTO regime includes a number of devices to address this concern, including opting out of normal trade relations, opting in to deeper trade relations, granting preferential treatment to developing countries consistent with security interests, and protecting against the nullification or impairment of Member States’ legitimate expectations even in the absence of a WTO violation. These arrangements provide broad discretion to act in furtherance of the national interest without violating trade rules. As such, Member States quite often can advance national objectives without the need to invoke the security exception.

Notwithstanding these mitigating factors, a self-judging security exception poses grave risks. If abused, it could undermine the entire WTO regime. But the practice of WTO Member States is to invoke the security exception in good faith, with a margin of discretion. A Member State may do so because of a fear of sanction, out of a sense of norm legitimacy, or because it is in its self-interest to do so.

The Article concludes with brief reflections on why nations comply with the good faith obligation of a self-judging exception. Compliance with a self-judging rule offers useful insights into larger questions of why nations obey international law. Rational choice and normative theories best explain compliance with a self-judging international norm.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 63

Keywords: WTO, GATT, National Security, International Law Compliance, BITs

JEL Classification: K33

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Date posted: June 9, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Alford, Roger Paul, The Self-Judging WTO Security Exception (June 7, 2012). 2011 Utah Law Review 697; Notre Dame Legal Studies Paper No. 2079608. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2079608

Contact Information

Roger Paul Alford (Contact Author)
Notre Dame Law School ( email )
P.O. Box 780
Notre Dame, IN 46556-0780
United States
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