Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2081921
 


 



What the Brain Saw: The Case of Trayvon Martin and the Need for Eyewitness Identification Reform


Valena Elizabeth Beety


West Virginia University - College of Law

March 20, 2013

Denver University Law Review, Vol. 90:2, 2012
WVU Law Research Paper No. 2012-03

Abstract:     
The shooting of Trayvon Martin has caused many to question what exactly led to the death of an unarmed seventeen-year-old African-American teenager. This essay provides at least one answer: the brain in creating and preserving memories can distort one's perception of events and people. In the courtroom, eyewitness testimony can be the most powerful and riveting information for a jury – and yet can contain that same inaccuracy of perception and memory. Bringing these two separate but connected insights together, this essay examines the role of memory and perception in the death of Trayvon Martin, along with eyewitness identification in criminal cases, ultimately calling for broad reform in our criminal justice system.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 17

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Date posted: June 12, 2012 ; Last revised: September 3, 2014

Suggested Citation

Beety, Valena Elizabeth, What the Brain Saw: The Case of Trayvon Martin and the Need for Eyewitness Identification Reform (March 20, 2013). Denver University Law Review, Vol. 90:2, 2012; WVU Law Research Paper No. 2012-03. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract= or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2081921

Contact Information

Valena Elizabeth Beety (Contact Author)
West Virginia University - College of Law ( email )
Box 6130
Morgantown, WV 26506
United States

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