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http://ssrn.com/abstract=2101137
 
 

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Hold On: The Remarkably Resilient, Constitutionally Dubious '48-Hour Hold'


Steven J. Mulroy


University of Memphis - Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law

July 5, 2012

University of Memphis Legal Studies Research Paper No. 116

Abstract:     
For decades, various local jurisdictions used (and in some areas, still use) a constitutionally suspect procedure called a "48-hour hold." A suspect is detained for up to 48 hours without charge while an investigation continues; after 48 hours, the suspect is either charged or released. The practice continues despite occasional criticism by courts, the bar, and the press. In many cases, this practice unconstitutionally detains persons without probable cause. Even where probable cause exists, the practice improperly circumvents rights to get bail, to get a prompt bail determination, and to be free of interrogation without the presence of counsel. While similar procedures may occur in other countries, it is contrary to American principles of criminal justice. Understanding why may also help in current debates over the proposed use of "investigative holds" of terrorism suspects.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 37

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Date posted: July 6, 2012 ; Last revised: July 11, 2012

Suggested Citation

Mulroy, Steven J., Hold On: The Remarkably Resilient, Constitutionally Dubious '48-Hour Hold' (July 5, 2012). University of Memphis Legal Studies Research Paper No. 116. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2101137 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2101137

Contact Information

Steven J. Mulroy (Contact Author)
University of Memphis - Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law ( email )
One North Front Street
Memphis, TN 38103-2189
United States

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