Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2120726
 


 



Restorative Justice in Islam: Should Qisas be Considered a Form of Restorative Justice?


Susan C. Hascall


Duquesne University - School of Law

2012

Berkeley Journal of Middle Eastern & Islamic Law, Forthcoming
Duquesne University School of Law Research Paper No. 2012-11

Abstract:     
The restorative justice movement challenges conventional approaches to sentencing and punishment by involving the victim, community, and perpetrator in sentencing. The movement is characterized by an emphasis on the restoration of relationships, healing and rehabilitation. Like the restorative justice movement, Islamic law embraces a conception of justice that involves healing relationships. Shari’ah, the religious law of Islam, is based on Islamic teachings on justice and divine revelation. IN classical Shari’ah jurisprudence, crimes are divided into several categories, which do not easily correspond to the categories defined in modern Western law. One of these categories, the crimes of qisas, is distinctive in that it gives the victim and his/her family final decision making power in punishment for physical wounding and murder. Although the victim(s) may choose retaliation in kind, payment, or forgiveness, emphasis is placed on the latter. This paper explores whether (1) qisas is a form of restorative justice (2) whether restorative justice adherents should examine the qisas processes for inspiration or methodology.

This paper begins by discussing the ideology behind the restorative justice movement and then proceeds to describe the classical Islamic law of qisas. Subsequently, examples of modern codes incorporating the law of qisas are provided. One of these exemplars highlighted within the text, particularly demonstrative of the abovementioned amalgamation, is northern Nigeria. The article concludes by emphasizing that, irrespective of the option for retaliation in kind, enough similarities and goals in the approaches of classical qisas jurisprudence, as exemplified in the modern codes of northern Nigeria, restorative justice scholars should examine qisas. There is also a calling for further field research on the processes of qisas in modern Shari’ah-based criminal jurisprudence.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 35

Keywords: Restorative justice, Shari’ah, Islam, criminal law, punishment, qisas, Nigeria, retaliation, Africa, comparative

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Date posted: July 31, 2012 ; Last revised: August 10, 2013

Suggested Citation

Hascall, Susan C., Restorative Justice in Islam: Should Qisas be Considered a Form of Restorative Justice? (2012). Berkeley Journal of Middle Eastern & Islamic Law, Forthcoming ; Duquesne University School of Law Research Paper No. 2012-11. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2120726

Contact Information

Susan C. Hascall (Contact Author)
Duquesne University - School of Law ( email )
600 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15282
United States

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