Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2131375
 


 



The Crazy Horse Malt Liquor Case: From Tradition to Modernity and Halfway Back


Frank Pommersheim


University of South Dakota Law School

2012

South Dakota Law Review, Vol. 57, p. 42, 2012

Abstract:     
Tasunke Witko, or Crazy Horse as he is known in English, is a revered nineteenth century warrior and spiritual leader of the Oglala Band of the Lakota (or Sioux) Nation. He is renowned for both his skills as a warrior and his high spiritual concern for the welfare of his people. He also often seems to stand apart as a mysterious, even mystical, individual. His picture was never taken by a photographer. He never went to Washington, D.C. to meet the “white fathers.” He never signed a treaty with the United States government. He never claimed to be a chief or tribal leader. He was ultimately killed in 1877, when he was held captive pursuant to his “surrender” at Camp Robinson in Nebraska. This, too, is shrouded in mystery.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 24

Keywords: Indian law, commercial free speech

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: August 18, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Pommersheim, Frank, The Crazy Horse Malt Liquor Case: From Tradition to Modernity and Halfway Back (2012). South Dakota Law Review, Vol. 57, p. 42, 2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2131375

Contact Information

Frank Pommersheim (Contact Author)
University of South Dakota Law School ( email )
414 E. Clark Street
Vermillion, SD 57069
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 820
Downloads: 103
Download Rank: 155,069

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.375 seconds