Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2173899
 
 

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Six Puzzles for Professor Akhil Amar


Seth Barrett Tillman


National University of Ireland, Maynooth (NUI Maynooth) - Faculty of Law

March 4, 2013

Loyola University of Chicago Law School, Fourth Annual Constitutional Law Colloquium Conference Paper 1-30 (Nov. 1, 2013), and Northwestern University School of Law Workshop (November 5, 2013), and University of Chicago Legal Scholarship Workshop (November 11, 2013)

Abstract:     
The Constitution of 1787 uses a variety of language in regard to "office" and "officer."

It makes use of several variants on "office under the United States," and it also uses "officer of the United States," "office under the Authority of the United States," and, sometimes, just "officer" without any modifying terminology. Why did the Framers make these stylistic choices (if a choice it was)?

(And what was the Constitution referring to in Article VI's obscure "public trust under the United States" language?)

From time to time commentators have suggested answers. One such view was put forward in 1995 by Professors Akhil and Vikram Amar. They opined that each of these categories were indistinguishable: each category referred to Executive Branch and Judicial Branch officers, including the President (and, apparently, the Vice President).

I contest their atextual position.

If you are interested in the "officers" dispute, or if you just want to know where the bodies are buried...this paper is for you. "Six Puzzles for Professor Akhil Amar." Sometimes the title says all you really need to know.

INTRODUCTION: Dear Professor Amar,

Here are six constitutional puzzles for your consideration. I would be very pleased if you responded, but I do not expect you to do so. I am sure you are very busy. Still, many, many people have read your books and articles, and heard your lectures and podcasts. And some of them are almost as smart and prolific (at least, collectively) as you are. So, even if you will not, perhaps, one or more of your many colleagues and students, readers and listeners would like to respond to one or more of these challenges.

Puzzle 1. Does “Officer,” as used in the Succession Clause, Encompass Legislative Officers?
Puzzle 2. Does Impeachment Extend to Former “Officers”?
Puzzle 3. Who are the “Officers of the United States”?
Puzzle 4. Is the President an “Officer of the United States”?
Puzzle 5. Is the Presidency an “Office...under the United States”?
Puzzle 6. Is “Officer of the United States” Coextensive with “Office under the United States”?

...with the author's proposed answer key.

The version now on line has been revised, clarified, and expanded.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 36

working papers series


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Date posted: November 11, 2012 ; Last revised: October 20, 2013

Suggested Citation

Tillman, Seth Barrett, Six Puzzles for Professor Akhil Amar (March 4, 2013). Loyola University of Chicago Law School, Fourth Annual Constitutional Law Colloquium Conference Paper 1-30 (Nov. 1, 2013), and Northwestern University School of Law Workshop (November 5, 2013), and University of Chicago Legal Scholarship Workshop (November 11, 2013) . Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2173899 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2173899

Contact Information

Seth Barrett Tillman (Contact Author)
National University of Ireland, Maynooth (NUI Maynooth) - Faculty of Law ( email )
Ollscoil na hÉireann, Má Nuad
New House (#306)
Maynooth, County Kildare
Ireland
(353) (0) 1474-7216 (Phone)
HOME PAGE: http://law.nuim.ie/staff/mr-seth-barrett-tillman
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References:  24
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