Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2176350
 
 

Footnotes (299)



 


 



Legitimacy, Innovation and Harmonization: Precursors to Operationalizing Biofuels Sustainability Standards


Jody M. Endres


University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences - Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences

November 15, 2012

37 S. Ill. Univ. L. R. 1 (2012)

Abstract:     
How to balance land uses to sustainably feed, clothe and power a burgeoning population aspiring to western lifestyles will be one of, if not the most profound challenges to policymakers in the 21st century. And, climate change’s unpredictable effects on natural systems will exacerbate already complex, uncertain and contentious land use decisionmaking. While biomass-based energy policies gained momentum throughout the 2000s as one way to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, assumptions about biofuels’ environmental and societal benefits are beginning to come under closer scrutiny. In response, public laws have incorporated varying forms of sustainability considerations. Many private standards have emerged, however, to fill real and perceived gaps in, or in some cases anticipate, future regulatory requirements demanding increased sustainability. Aspirations aside, the critical question moving forward will be how to operationalize sustainability regimes to address governmental and societal concerns. Agricultural biomass sustainability regimes represent a particularly ground-breaking paradigm shift within a traditional commodity-crop landscape that historically has not been subject to widespread certification to specialized sustainability metrics. Although certification is not new to the forestry sector, energy biomass presents unique questions surrounding increased harvests, novel species and practices, and complex carbon accounting. With these new landscape dynamics in mind, and assuming regulatory drivers will encourage operators to seek certification, I posit that private and public actors must successfully navigate three preconditions of operationalization in order to ultimately achieve the sustainability goals contained in any sustainability standard: (1) ensuring standards organizations are built on good governance principles; (2) shifting the paradigm within conventional agricultural landscapes to enable technological and institutional innovations for increased sustainability; and, (3) standards harmonization to facilitate international markets. I conclude that each in and of itself presents great challenges at all levels in transitioning from theoretical to operational standards.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 52

Keywords: biofuels, standards, sustainability

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: November 16, 2012 ; Last revised: February 14, 2013

Suggested Citation

Endres, Jody M., Legitimacy, Innovation and Harmonization: Precursors to Operationalizing Biofuels Sustainability Standards (November 15, 2012). 37 S. Ill. Univ. L. R. 1 (2012). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2176350

Contact Information

Jody M. Endres (Contact Author)
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences - Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences ( email )
Champaign, IL 61820
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 769
Downloads: 130
Download Rank: 128,701
Footnotes:  299

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo4 in 0.313 seconds