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http://ssrn.com/abstract=2177988
 
 

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Evolutionary Perspectives on Child Welfare Law


David J. Herring


University of New Mexico School of Law

November 19, 2012

The Evolution of Violence, Springer, 2013
U. of Pittsburgh Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2012-32

Abstract:     
Evolutionary theory and behavioral biology research have produced knowledge that is potentially useful in addressing violence against children. This chapter highlights two areas of child welfare law, policy, and practice for which this new knowledge has significant implications. First, the relevant behavioral studies contribute to the construction of research-based risk assessment tools through the identification of conditions or situations that increase the risk of violent acts against children. Second, the research supports the development of criteria for foster care placement decisions through the delineation of factors that predict the relative level of parental investment expected from different types of foster parents. This chapter also discusses the potential for additional research inquiries based on evolutionary theory that may have important implications for public child welfare systems.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 34

Keywords: behavioral biology, child maltreatment, child welfare, evolutionary theory, foster care, grandparents, kinship, parental investment, risk assessment

JEL Classification: I30, I31, J12, J13, K19, K39

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Date posted: November 20, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Herring, David J., Evolutionary Perspectives on Child Welfare Law (November 19, 2012). The Evolution of Violence, Springer, 2013; U. of Pittsburgh Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2012-32. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2177988

Contact Information

David J. Herring (Contact Author)
University of New Mexico School of Law ( email )
1117 Stanford, N.E.
Albuquerque, NM 87131
United States

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