Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2186978
 
 

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Does Immigration, Particularly Increases in Latinos, Affect African American Wages, Unemployment and Incarceration Rates?


Jack Strauss


University of Denver - Reiman School of Finance

December 8, 2012


Abstract:     
This paper evaluates the impact of immigration on African American wages, unemployment, employment and incarceration rates using a relatively large cross-sectional data-set of 900 cities. An endemic problem potentially plaguing the cross-sectional metro approach to immigration has been endogeneity. Does increased immigration to a city lead to improved economic outcomes, or does a city's improving labor market attract immigrant inflows? The paper focuses on resolving the endogeneity concerns through a variety of controls, statistical methods and tests. Overall, results strongly support one-way causation from increased immigration including Latinos to higher African American wages and lower poverty. Rising immigration including from Latin America is not responsible for higher Black incarceration rates.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 42

Keywords: immigration, African American, wages

JEL Classification: J15, J61, R23, J1, K42

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Date posted: December 11, 2012 ; Last revised: March 3, 2013

Suggested Citation

Strauss, Jack, Does Immigration, Particularly Increases in Latinos, Affect African American Wages, Unemployment and Incarceration Rates? (December 8, 2012). Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2186978 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2186978

Contact Information

Jack Strauss (Contact Author)
University of Denver - Reiman School of Finance ( email )
2101 S. University Blvd
Denver, CO COLORADO 80126
United States
314 602 7265 (Phone)
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References:  14
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