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http://ssrn.com/abstract=2188906
 
 

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Fuels for Electric Power Generation: Regulatory, Policy, and Economic Pressures


David B. Spence


University of Texas at Austin - Department of Business, Government and Society; University of Texas at Austin - School of Law

Emily Hammond


George Washington University - Law School

December 12, 2012

Global Climate Change and U.S. Law (2d ed., Michael B. Gerrard & Jody Freeman, eds.) (Forthcoming)
Wake Forest Univ. Legal Studies Paper No. 2188906

Abstract:     
The electric power sector is facing significant new economic and regulatory pressures that are changing the electric generation mix. In this chapter in the forthcoming book Global Climate Change and U.S. Law, we examine the regulation of fuels used for electric power generation, focusing on regulatory trends and economic considerations that are likely to have the largest impacts on greenhouse gas emissions and, therefore, climate change. Perhaps the biggest driver of change is the prospect of stable, relatively low prices for natural gas for the foreseeable future. As gas becomes cost-competitive with coal as an electricity generation fuel, it is commanding a growing share of the electric generation market, usually at the expense of coal. Increasingly stringent regulation of the environmental externalities associated with coal mining and coal combustion seem likely to hasten this trend. But the prospect of inexpensive natural gas discourages the development of other, less carbon intensive electric generation sources, including nuclear and renewable generation. Prospective investors in new generation face an increasingly competitive wholesale electricity market: new nuclear and renewable plants will compete with natural gas-fired plants for customers, and price will be the focus of that competition. Policies like state renewable portfolio standards and financial incentives for nuclear and renewables will continue to drive some development of those technologies. However, absent a significant change in the relative costs of these electric generation fuels, the creation of additional market demand for renewables or nuclear power will require the creation of new policies driving that demand.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 48

Keywords: greenhouse gas, electricity, natural gas, renewables, energy, climate change, nuclear, coal

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Date posted: December 15, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Spence, David B. and Hammond, Emily, Fuels for Electric Power Generation: Regulatory, Policy, and Economic Pressures (December 12, 2012). Global Climate Change and U.S. Law (2d ed., Michael B. Gerrard & Jody Freeman, eds.) (Forthcoming); Wake Forest Univ. Legal Studies Paper No. 2188906. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2188906

Contact Information

David B. Spence
University of Texas at Austin - Department of Business, Government and Society ( email )
CBA 5.202
Austin, TX 78712
United States
512-471-0778 (Phone)
512-343-0535 (Fax)
University of Texas at Austin - School of Law ( email )
727 East Dean Keeton Street
Austin, TX 78705
United States
Emily Hammond (Contact Author)
George Washington University - Law School ( email )
2000 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20052
United States

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