Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2189021
 
 

Footnotes (140)



 


 



It's Not About Us: Beyond the Job Market Critique of U.S. Law Schools


Elizabeth Chambliss


University of South Carolina - School of Law

December 13, 2012

Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics, Forthcoming
NYLS Legal Studies Research Paper No. 49

Abstract:     
Professor Brian Tamanaha’s recent book, Failing Law Schools, offers a damning critique of U.S. law schools from law students’ economic perspective – especially students at non-elite law schools with diminishing access to corporate law jobs. According to Tamanaha, “the current economic barrier to a legal career is one of the most important social justice issues of our age.” Yet U.S. law schools have bigger problems than the contraction of entry-level hiring by large law firms; and law school faculty, deans, and regulators have duties to other stakeholders, in addition to students. This review criticizes Tamanaha’s analysis, and his prescriptions for reform going forward, as a dangerous diversion from a more ambitious and disruptive critique.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 24

Keywords: law school, legal education, legal profession, stratification, segmentation

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: December 14, 2012 ; Last revised: April 7, 2013

Suggested Citation

Chambliss, Elizabeth, It's Not About Us: Beyond the Job Market Critique of U.S. Law Schools (December 13, 2012). Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics, Forthcoming; NYLS Legal Studies Research Paper No. 49. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2189021

Contact Information

Elizabeth Chambliss (Contact Author)
University of South Carolina - School of Law ( email )
Main & Greene Streets
Columbia, SC 29208
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 958
Downloads: 240
Download Rank: 69,966
Footnotes:  140

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo7 in 0.438 seconds