Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2190707
 
 

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Constitutional Adjudication, Free Expression and the Fashionable Art of Corporation-Bashing


Martin H. Redish


Northwestern University - School of Law

Peter B. Siegal


Northwestern University - School of Law

September 14, 2012

Texas Law Review, Forthcoming
Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 12-35

Abstract:     
Professor Redish and Mr. Siegal explain why the Supreme Court in Citizens United was correct to recognize free speech rights of profit-making corporations. They argue first that there is no rational basis on which to distinguish the First Amendment rights of media corporations from those of other corporations, noting that the Supreme Court has never drawn a distinction between the free speech rights of the media and private speakers. They further argue that vesting free speech rights in corporations furthers important First Amendment values, in particular informing the electorate and checking government.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 28

Keywords: First Amendment, Free Speech, Freedom of Expression, Constitutional Law, Corporations, Freedom of the Press

JEL Classification: K10, K19, K20, K29

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Date posted: December 22, 2012  

Suggested Citation

Redish, Martin H. and Siegal, Peter B., Constitutional Adjudication, Free Expression and the Fashionable Art of Corporation-Bashing (September 14, 2012). Texas Law Review, Forthcoming; Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 12-35. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2190707

Contact Information

Martin H. Redish (Contact Author)
Northwestern University - School of Law ( email )
375 E. Chicago Ave
Unit 1505
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
Peter B. Siegal
Northwestern University - School of Law ( email )
375 E. Chicago Ave
Unit 1505
Chicago, IL 60611
United States
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