Abstract

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The Success of a Nation’s Soccer Team: A Bellwether Regarding a Nation’s Electronic Information Infrastructure, the Legal Regulations that Govern the Infrastructure, the Resulting Citizen-Trust in Its Government and Its E-Readiness in Nigeria, the DPRK, China, Japan, South Korea, the Netherlands and the United States


Kris Helge


University of North Texas; Texas Wesleyan University School of Law

December 1, 2012

Northern Kentucky Law Review, Vol. 39, No. 3, 2012

Abstract:     
Information technology infrastructures should be designed with cutting-edge equipment that offers citizens consistent and dependable access to necessary and pertinent information. The infrastructures should be held accountable and regulated by a well-established legal system. Additionally, the infrastructures should create a body politic that trusts its government, is aware of its nation’s laws, regulations, and policies, and is motivated to contribute and participate positively in the national economy and political process. In modern societies, the most efficacious means in which a nation-state can create an information infrastructure is via electronic technology (“e-technology”). Some nation-states are currently better prepared than others to provide information to their citizens via e-technologies, and some are more willing to provide a free exchange of electronic information. An assessment of how well a nation can disseminate freely accessible, valid, and reliable information, and how willing nations are to provide complete, accurate, and open information via e-technologies is defined as “e-readiness." Scholars have posited numerous models to measure e-readiness. These models use various factors to measure a nation’s e-readiness. This paper takes an eclectic approach from these proposed models and uses three factors to examine and determine the e-readiness of various nation-states: 1) whether a nation-state maintains a well-organized electronic information infrastructure (“EII”) that distributes valid and reliable information; 2) whether it has a reliable legal system that ensures that the information infrastructure is acting to benefitits members of society; and 3) whether the information infrastructure and the regulatory system are increasing societal trust and therefore citizen participation in economic and civic activities.

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Date posted: January 2, 2013  

Suggested Citation

Helge, Kris, The Success of a Nation’s Soccer Team: A Bellwether Regarding a Nation’s Electronic Information Infrastructure, the Legal Regulations that Govern the Infrastructure, the Resulting Citizen-Trust in Its Government and Its E-Readiness in Nigeria, the DPRK, China, Japan, South Korea, the Netherlands and the United States (December 1, 2012). Northern Kentucky Law Review, Vol. 39, No. 3, 2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2195718

Contact Information

Kris Helge (Contact Author)
University of North Texas ( email )
1155 Union Circle #305340
Denton, TX 76203
United States
817-369-7815 (Phone)
Texas Wesleyan University School of Law ( email )
Fort Worth, TX 76105
United States
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