Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2220321
 
 

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Enhancing the Role of Public Interest Organizations in Rulemaking via Pre-Notice Transparency


Richard W. Murphy


Texas Tech University School of Law

November 15, 2012

Wake Forest Law Review, Vol. 47, No. 3, 2012

Abstract:     
We can think of the administrative rulemaking process as handing hammers to interested parties with which they can pound agencies. It seems reasonable to expect that regulated parties, which have profits on the line and insider knowledge to share, will be able to pound agencies harder than public interest groups. And the rulemaking process does indeed seem to skew in this expected direction.

This Essay explores one suggestion for a partial fix: Require prompt, electronic, and searchable disclosure of communications to agency officials directly bearing on the merits of potential rulemaking — regardless of whether a formal notice of rulemaking has been issued. Adopting this aggressive disclosure regime would not correct the basic problem of a resource imbalance that so favors industry — but then nothing, realistically, could. It would, however, make it somewhat easier for public interest groups to obtain the information they need to influence rulemaking in a timely way — before an agency’s policy choices crystallize.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 23

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Date posted: February 19, 2013  

Suggested Citation

Murphy, Richard W., Enhancing the Role of Public Interest Organizations in Rulemaking via Pre-Notice Transparency (November 15, 2012). Wake Forest Law Review, Vol. 47, No. 3, 2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2220321

Contact Information

Richard Wyman Murphy (Contact Author)
Texas Tech University School of Law ( email )
1802 Hartford
Lubbock, TX 79409
United States
806-742-3990 ex.320 (Phone)
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