Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2228339
 


 



Lawyers and the New Institutionalism


Paul R. Tremblay


Boston College - Law School

Judith A. McMorrow


Boston College - Law School

January 15, 2013

University of St. Thomas Law Journal, Vol. 9, No. 2, January 2013
Boston College Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 288

Abstract:     
Drawing on the sociological theory of new institutionalism, this essay explores the ethical behavior and decision-making of lawyers by reference to the organizational context in which lawyers work. As the new institutionalism predicts, lawyers develop powerful assimilated informal norms, practices, habits, and customs that sometimes complement and other times supplant formal substantive law on professional conduct. Structural choices in practice settings influence the creation of these informal norms. The challenge for the legal profession, and particularly academics who teach legal ethics, is how to prepare law students and lawyers better to recognize and analyze the norms in their practice setting and to encourage management choices within practice settings that more likely provide norms that enhance rather than degrade ethical decision-making.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 26

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Date posted: March 5, 2013  

Suggested Citation

Tremblay, Paul R. and McMorrow, Judith A., Lawyers and the New Institutionalism (January 15, 2013). University of St. Thomas Law Journal, Vol. 9, No. 2, January 2013; Boston College Law School Legal Studies Research Paper No. 288. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2228339

Contact Information

Paul R. Tremblay (Contact Author)
Boston College - Law School ( email )
885 Centre Street
Newton, MA 02459-1163
United States
Judith A. McMorrow
Boston College - Law School ( email )
885 Centre Street
Newton, MA 02459-1163
United States
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