Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2229365
 
 

Citations (1)



 


 



Pseudonyms and the Rise of the Real-Name Web


Bernie Hogan


University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute

December 1, 2012

In J. Hartley, J. Burgess, & A. Bruns (Eds.), A Companion to New Media Dynamics (pp. 290–308). Chichester, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Forthcoming

Abstract:     
Despite their ubiquity, pseudonyms are an under-theorized element of online participation, as is the use of real names (or names commonly used to personally identify someone). This absence has become especially acute in recent years as sites listing an individual’s real name have become common. This shift towards real names is not merely a technical convenience, but a specific political turn. As pseudonyms are often associated with Internet trolling and cyberbullying, it is useful to track the use of pseudonyms in history and to consider many of their positive functions. Ironically, pseudonyms help to solve a problem that Facebook creates – the single heterogeneous audience, i.e., the collapsed context.

I describe three classes of pseudonyms: functional, where pseudonyms denote a specific social or technical function, such as eight character names or official titles; situational, where an external motivating force compels people to hide their real name identities (and of attributes) and personal, where an internal drive to adopt a different persona makes pseudonyms useful. I then describe how these uses operated in a pre-web 2.0 era, and how their use persists.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 17

Keywords: pseudonyms, nymwars, real-name, social media, social network site, Facebook

Accepted Paper Series





Download This Paper

Date posted: March 7, 2013  

Suggested Citation

Hogan, Bernie, Pseudonyms and the Rise of the Real-Name Web (December 1, 2012). In J. Hartley, J. Burgess, & A. Bruns (Eds.), A Companion to New Media Dynamics (pp. 290–308). Chichester, UK: Blackwell Publishing Ltd., Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2229365

Contact Information

Bernie Hogan (Contact Author)
University of Oxford - Oxford Internet Institute ( email )
1 St. Giles
University of Oxford
Oxford OX1 3PG Oxfordshire, Oxfordshire OX1 3JS
United Kingdom
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 1,391
Downloads: 158
Download Rank: 113,702
Citations:  1

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo1 in 0.484 seconds