Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=2251346
 


 



(Re)Arrangement of State/Islam Relations in Egypt’s Constitutional Transition


Gianluca Parolin


The American University in Cairo; Tokyo University of Foreign Studies; New York University School of Law

May 10, 2013

NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 13-15

Abstract:     
After briefly framing state/shari‘ah relations in pre-2011 Egypt, the paper (1) describes the negotiations behind the (re)arrangement of shari‘ah-provisions in the new constitution, (2) analyzes the content of the new provisions in their Hegelian relation to the previous Supreme Constitutional Court jurisprudence — expounding on the complex articulation of the explanatory note to art. 2 (art. 219) — and (c) considers the ramifications of the new arrangement, focusing on the impact of the mandatory referral to al-Azhar.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 11

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Date posted: April 17, 2013 ; Last revised: May 10, 2013

Suggested Citation

Parolin, Gianluca, (Re)Arrangement of State/Islam Relations in Egypt’s Constitutional Transition (May 10, 2013). NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 13-15. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2251346 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2251346

Contact Information

Gianluca Parolin (Contact Author)
The American University in Cairo ( email )
113 Kasr El Aini St., P.O. Box 2511
Cairo 11511
United States
+20 2 2615 3405 (Phone)
+20 2 2615 4573 (Fax)
HOME PAGE: http://www.aucegypt.edu/fac/Profiles/Pages/GianlucaParolin.aspx
Tokyo University of Foreign Studies ( email )
3-11-1 Asahi-Cho, Fuchu-shi
Tokyo, 183-8534
Japan
New York University School of Law ( email )
40 Washington Square South
New York, NY 10012-1099
United States
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